Project Description

Solo Trombone and Wind Ensemble. (2007) 36′

Listen Now


Perusal Score
PDF, 34 MB
(Opens in new window)


Sheet Music

Buy Score and Parts
(Maslanka Press)


Recordings

David Maslanka: Symphony No. 8 (2009)

,

Illinois State University Wind Symphony, Stephen K. Steele, cond. Stephen Parsons, trombone, Adriana La Rosa Ransom, violoncello

Glass Bead (2011)

University of Alabama Wind Ensemble, Kenneth Ozzello and Randall Coleman, cond. Jonathan Whitaker, trombone

Wolf Rounds (2010)

Frost Wind Ensemble at the University of Miami, Gary Green, cond. Tim Conner, trombone

Instrumentation
Solo Tbn | Fl-3(1»Picc) Ob-2(2»EH) BbCl-3 BCl CACl Bsn-2(2»CBsn) ASx(»SSx) | Hn-2 Tpt-3 Tbn BTbn Tuba Vc DB | Pno Timp Perc-4



The Trombone Concerto is composed for an ensemble of 21 wind and brass instruments, double bass, piano, and a substantial percussion group. It is in three large movements, each of a very intense song-like nature. In addition to the solo trombone the Concerto features a prominent supporting solo cello part.

The Concerto was commissioned by a consortium of music schools headed by Gary Green of the University of Miami Frost School of Music, and is dedicated to the memory of flutist Christine Nield Capote.

Movements
1. Requiem
2. Beloved
3. Be Content, Be Calm
Program Note

Conversations with Gary Green and Tim Conner (the conductor and trombonist who commissioned the music) led to the idea that this concerto should be a “cross-over” piece, one that could be played by either a wind ensemble, or a symphony orchestra minus most of the strings. Before I began composing, word came of the untimely death of Christine Nield Capote, wonderful flutist and teacher and long-time friend to Gary, Tim and me. It was only a year ago, in July of 2006 that Gary, Christine, and I worked together at the Interlochen Center for the Arts on a deeply moving performance of my Song Book for Flute and Wind Ensemble. It was one the Christine’s favorite pieces. She had only nine months to live.

It became clear that the Trombone Concerto would be a memorial for Christine. To that end I chose an ensemble or orchestral winds, plus piano, double bass, percussion, and one solo cello, the cello representing her cellist husband, Manny.

It feels presumptuous for me to say anything at all about this music, presumptuous even to have written the piece, trying to embody Christine’s still-living presence, her voice, her feelings, for us who are left behind. Following her death I saw Christine in a meditative vision. She gave me the most brilliant smile of recognition and reassurance. She then turned and walked away. Requiem – beloved – be content, be calm.

Program note by David Maslanka.


Further Reading